Together, we will significantly improve the lives of people living with schizophrenia.

Whether it is a great meal, a walk around the block or cleaning a house, according to Leanne O’Reily (pictured above), when you live with schizophrenia, it’s important to have a sense of achievement.

Getting out and about gives you confidence – confidence to get out more.’

With thanks to supporters just like you, the team at NeuRA are embarking on an exciting study called the Canakinumab Add on Treatment for Schizophrenia (CATS) trial. Researchers you support are testing whether a particular treatment, canakinumab, when taken alongside antipsychotic medication, has a positive effect on language, memory and other symptoms of schizophrenia.

Simply, we’re hoping this treatment will restore function, help build confidence and significantly improve the lives of people living with schizophrenia.

As the end of the financial year approaches, please give generously. This will allow more people to join the trial and help determine if this treatment can bring about the improvements it promises.
Thank you.

‘You must never tell anyone about it’

Sometimes, people say the most shocking things about schizophrenia.

Meet Leanne O’Reilly – daughter, sister, aunt, and friend.

There is something special about Leanne… she has a spark. She enjoys her part-time job, embraces life’s little joys like a great meal, laughs at Benny Hill and is an incredible, selfless friend to those around her. She loves gardening, tapestry, cooking and this Easter had made chocolate eggs for her nephews.

Leanne also lives with schizophrenia.

‘We knew something was wrong, but we didn’t know what it was.’

It was clear from an early age that Leanne was intelligent. She had a very happy childhood and dreamt of becoming a doctor. At the end of her schooling she was accepted into a veterinary science degree, which had a similar entrance mark to medicine.

Heartbreakingly honest, she shares what happened next.

‘If I’d stayed normal, I probably would have been happy doing vet science.’

Leanne was 15 when the first signs of a developing mental illness were seen.

‘It was about that time that I turned miserable,’ she remembers. ‘I blamed everyone else for it.’

Her devoted mum, a retired biology teacher, suspected something was wrong. But after seeing many year 9 girls come through her classes, she also knew this was sometimes a difficult age for young women.

Have you ever suspected something wasn’t quite right with a loved one, but felt unsure what to do?

At the age of 17, Leanne was diagnosed with schizophrenia. People’s reaction to the diagnosis didn’t help.

‘Someone told me to never tell anyone about Leanne’s diagnosis,’ Leanne’s mother remembers.

Comments like this are hurtful, and encourage a very cruel stigma about the illness. Together, we must do everything we can to Discover the causes of schizophrenia, Conquer the causes through innovative therapies and ultimately, find Cures.

A sense of achievement is very important.

Whether it is a great meal, a walk around the block or cleaning a house, Leanne is clear – it’s important to have a sense of achievement.

‘Getting out and about gives you confidence – confidence to get out more.’

We often hear that schizophrenia brings poor self-confidence, crushing loneliness and apathy. Even small improvements in the lives of people with schizophrenia can make things better. It can give life more meaning.

Thanks to your support, our understanding of the causes and treatment of the illness has never been better.

Now, as the end of the financial year approaches, your gift could bring new confidence and hope to the 200,000 Australians living with schizophrenia.

The Canakinumab Add on Treatment for Schizophrenia (CATS) trial – the future and the present.

The team at NeuRA are testing whether a particular treatment, canakinumab, when taken alongside antipsychotic medication, has a positive effect on language, memory and other symptoms of schizophrenia.

Simply put, we’re hoping this treatment will restore function and help build confidence.

With your enduring support, we look forward to the day schizophrenia is conquered. That day will come, with the CATS study an important step toward it.

Leanne is a volunteer in the study and you can read about her experiences below.

Please, partner with us this May.

Many research studies at NeuRA are simply not possible without you.

You can bring meaningful confidence and hope to someone living with schizophrenia. Please consider a gift today that will allow more people to enter the trial, and help us determine if this treatment can bring about the improvements it promises.

Together, and with your gift, we will significantly improve the lives of people living with schizophrenia.

So please, give generously.

P.S. If you’re interested in finding out more about the trial, Google ‘NeuRA CATS study’, or call 02 9399 1858.