Donate to help complete the NeuRA research building.

With much of NeuRA’s research centre still to be completed, you can help fit-out new laboratories, bringing together the best minds in science and discovering new cures.

For some, a building can represent their best chance at living a normal life… their only chance at finding answers to a burden inflicted on their family for generations. And so it is for many of the research participants awaiting the official opening of NeuRA’s new research building.

“This building represents more than just science, more than just the word research. It is a sign of hope, a sign that there are people out there fighting for answers and that those people may just save my life and my family’s future,” says Chontell Johnson.

At 18, Chontell became her mother’s carer, as her behaviour had started to change dramatically. She became more argumentative, defensive, and sometimes even hostile. NeuRA’s Dr Bill Brooks immediately recognised the symptoms and diagnosed dominantly inherited early-onset Alzheimer’s, a progressive brain disease that can appear as early as 30.

Many of Dr Brooks’ research colleagues have already moved into their new laboratories. However, the new research building is only partially completed, with three floors yet to be fully utilised due to lack of funding.

So with only a small percentage of private donor support left to be raised, we look to you, our valued supporters, to help us enhance our crucial research.

Please consider an urgent donation to assist with the completion of areas such as our specialist sleep, movement and gait measurement laboratories and sixth floor research areas for dementia, Parkinson’s disease and brain mapping research.

Thank you

 

For some people, a building can represent their best chance at living a normal life… their only chance at finding answers to a mysterious burden inflicted on their family for generations. And so it is for many of the research participants awaiting the official opening of NeuRA’s new research building.

“For me, this building represents more than just science, more than just the word research. It is a sign of hope, a sign that there are people out there fighting for answers and that those people may just save my life and my family’s future,” says Chontell Johnson.

At just 18, Chontell became her mother’s carer, as her behaviour had started to change dramatically. She became more argumentative, defensive, and sometimes even hostile, but round after round of tests were inconclusive.

Then, Chontell met NeuRA’s Dr Bill Brooks, who immediately recognised her mother’s symptoms and diagnosed dominantly inherited early-onset Alzheimer’s.

Alzheimer’s is a devastating, progressive brain disease that typically affects people over the age of 65. However early-onset Alzheimer’s can appear as early as 30. Dr Bill Brooks is part of the DIAN (Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network) study, a global collaboration studying the brains of siblings from families who have the genetic mutation.

“When Dr Bill Brooks informed me of the very exciting possibility of being a part of the DIAN study, it was as though I had been gifted an opportunity to be part of the cure. These researchers give their time, their energy and a good portion of their lives to finding an answer that will help me to live my life on my own terms, that will give a future to my family.”

Many of NeuRA’s researchers have already moved into their new laboratories. However, the new research building is only partially completed.

Please consider a donation to help complete every floor of this building, where our researchers work and volunteer participants, such as Chontell, visit for regular tests.

One of the wonderful things about the new NeuRA building is that it helps researchers, from different specialties, come together easily to share thinking, methodology and discoveries. The building is a modern and pleasant working environment, with open and light research spaces and specialist equipment, providing incentives to recruit top international researchers.

And so we look to you, our supporters, to help us enhance our crucial research. At completion, 60% of the costs will be provided from government, and 40% from private donors. Of the private donor support, just a small percentage is still to be raised. Our building appeal is a rare opportunity to give to a facility that will enable scientists to conquer our most harrowing diseases for decades to come.

Your donation can assist with the completion of important building sections such as our specialist sleep, movement and gait measurement laboratories and our sixth floor research areas for dementia, Parkinson’s disease and brain mapping research.

Chontell’s courage in the face of her disease is inspiring, but the experience of dementia or caring for someone with dementia is unfortunately not rare. The size and scope of our new research building is a sign of the predicted burden that diseases of the brain will have on humanity unless we can bring together the best minds in science and discover new cures.

“This new building is so important – it will provide the perfect environment to find answers, help people like me, and lessen the burden for future generations. We all have the capacity to give and I exhort you to support NeuRA so that every floor in this building can be finished and their amazing research can not only continue but be enhanced.”