Help families like the Rushtons and partner with us in conquering dementia.

Sadly, it is important you know that Bob has now passed away. It is an incredibly difficult time for Lisa and her young family. However she still wanted Bob’s story shared, becaused with more medical research and awareness, one day no family will have to suffer in the same way.

Will you help with a gift today so that one day, children like Stephanie, Amy and Poppy won’t lose their dad in such a horrible way?

Your generous gift of:
•  $50 could help our researchers work towards gaining a better understanding of the specific clinical features of the different types of dementia.
•  $100 could help us improve our understanding of the progression of each type of dementia.
•  $150 could help us achieve more accurate future health predictions.

Or perhaps you’d like to become a regular donor, and help See it Through to a Cure by making a small monthly donation.

Lisa (Bob’s widow’s) heartfelt comments say it all:

“NeuRA’s research is not going to help us. It’s not about us. It’s about ensuring we know enough about the amazing tool we have, our brain, so that we can help ensure people in the future don’t suffer in the same way.”

Every gift helps. Please, will you help NeuRA cure dementia?

 

 

As you will be aware, Bob has now lost his battle with dementia. The full story below was first told his story in November 2015. At that time he was desperately unwell – unable to communicate, bed ridden and spoon fed pureed foods.

As you know, not all stories have a happy ending. 

Bob Rushton was always more than he seemed.

“I remember watching him from a distance and saying to myself, ‘That’s the father I want for my (future) children’.”

Bob was surrounded by and returned love. He adored his daughter Stephanie with all he had, and when Amy and then a little later Poppy came along, his heart was full. Lisa jokes, “I always came third for Bob. It was his children first, then his motorbikes and then me”. Lisa remembers.

During a peace keeping mission, Bob wrote beautifully crafted letters to Lisa, revealing a philosophical side seen only by those in his close inner circle. Three years later, Amy came along followed by Poppy in 2007.

Bob was a wonderful family man. He enjoyed off-road riding, supporting the Wallabies, doting on his daughters and a career in medical and security services.

But, aged just 47, Bob had worked his last day.

Today, just six years later, Bob no longer communicates. He is spoon fed pureed foods, cannot walk, help himself out of a chair, and has little capability to show emotions or connect with his family.

Bob has Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) – a form of dementia.

Like most dementias, PPA gradually takes away everything.

Can you imagine how cruel this illness is?

Imagine what it is like for Stephanie in her late 20s? She’s losing her dad, and her children won’t know their granddad.

Or Amy, now 14, who says she ‘can’t remember what Daddy was like previously?’

And then there’s Poppy, aged 8? Little girls always need their dad, but for Poppy, she’ll never truly know hers.

You can help

There is much more to Bob’s story, and you can read the full story here. Lisa’s love for him is incredible, as is His girl’s affection for their dad.

Will you help with a gift today so that one day, children like Stephanie, Amy and Poppy won’t lose their dad in such a horrible way?

You generous gift of:
•  $50 could help our researchers work towards gaining a better understanding of the specific clinical features of the different types of dementia.
•  $100 could help us improve our understanding of the progression of each type of dementia.
•  $150 could help us achieve more accurate future health predictions.

Or perhaps you’d like to become a regular donor, and help See it Through to a Cure by making a small monthly donation.   

We are very grateful for your loyal support of medical research.